HDMI HD Explained

HDMI & HD EXPLAINED

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HDMI explained

HDMI (High-Definition Multimedia Interface) is a licensable audio/video connector interface for transmitting uncompressed, encrypted (HDCP) digital streams via a single cable. HDMI dramatically simplifies cabling and helps provide consumers with the highest-quality home theatre & gaming experience.

HDMI provides an interface between any audio/video source (Set-top box, DVD player, PC, Game console), as well as connecting an A/V receiver, to video displays (Digital flat screen display or projector) over a single cable.

HDMI is continually evolving to meet the needs of the market: Products implementing new versions of the HDMI specification will continue to be fully backward compatible with earlier HDMI products.

HDMI v1.4
Major enhancements introduced in the HDMI 1.4 specification are:

HDMI Ethernet Channel – Adds High-speed networking (bi-directional at up to 100Mb/sec) to an HDMI link, allowing users to take full advantage of their IP-enabled devices without a separate Ethernet cable.

  • Accommodates current and future IP-based networking solutions for consumer electronics, including DLNA, IPTV, LiquidHD, and UPnP.
  • Allows multiple connected devices to share an Internet connection.
  • Enables native-format content distribution between connected devices, including recording and playback across a networked system.

 

Audio Return Channel – Allows an HDMI-connected TV with a built-in tuner to send audio data "upstream" to a surround audio system, eliminating the need for a separate audio cable.

  • An Audio Return Channel-enabled TV can either send or receive audio via HDMI, upstream or downstream, depending on system set-up and user preferences.
  • LipSync functionality, introduced in HDMI 1.3, ensures that the audio stays matched to the video, automatically compensating for any processor delays whether the audio is travelling upstream or downstream.

 

3D – Defines input/output protocols for major 3D video formats, paving the way for true 3D gaming and 3D home theatre applications.

 

4K Support – Adds support for extremely high video resolutions (beyond 1080p). The term “4K” actually covers two formats, both supported in the HDMI 1.4 specification:

  • 3840 pixels wide by 2160 pixels high
  • 4096 pixels wide by 2160 pixels high

 

Content Type – Real-time signalling of content types between display and source devices. The “Content Type” feature enables a display to auto-select the correct viewing mode to match the content type it is currently receiving from a source device, and to switch modes when a new content source is selected.

 

Additional Colour Spaces – Adds support for additional colour models (colour gamut) used in digital photography and computer graphics. In addition to RGB colour and x.v.Color, the HDMI standard now offers native support for three additional colour spaces:

  • sYCC601 colour
  • Adobe RGB colour
  • Adobe YCC601 colour

 

HDMI Micro Connector – A new, smaller connector for phones and other portable devices, supporting video resolutions up to 1080p.This new "Type D" connector is roughly the size of a Micro USB connector and has a full nineteen-pin array like other HDMI connectors.

 

Automotive Connection System – New cables and connectors for automotive video systems, designed to meet the unique demands of the motoring environment while delivering true HD quality.

The new automotive connection system consists of two elements: A new type of Automotive HDMI cable and a new category of locking HDMI connector, known as the “Type E” connector, designed for securing internal connections within a vehicle.

 

New HDMI labelling
With the release of the HDMI V1.4 specification, the HDMI Licensing LLC has also introduced a new system of cable labelling. There are now five HDMI cable types, each designed to meet a particular performance standard. Here is an overview of the HDMI cable types, their capabilities, and how to tell them apart.

All HDMI cable products will now be required to be labelled by cable type:

Standard Speed HDMI 
Standard HDMI cable: HDMI cable that is designed and tested to reliably transmit 1080i or 720p video.

 

Standard Speed with Ethernet HDMI
Standard HDMI Cable with Ethernet: This cable type offers the same baseline performance as the Standard HDMI Cable shown above (720p or 1080i video resolution), plus an additional, dedicated data channel, known as the HDMI Ethernet Channel.


Automotive HDMI
Automotive HDMI Cable: Designed for internal cabling of vehicles equipped with onboard HD video systems. Tested to a more robust performance standard, and capable of withstanding the unique stresses of the motoring environment.

 

High Speed HDMI
High Speed HDMI Cable: The High Speed HDMI cable is designed and tested to handle video resolutions of 1080p and beyond, including 4K, 3D, and Deep Colour.

 

High Speed Ethernet HDMI
High Speed HDMI Cable with Ethernet: This cable type offers the same baseline performance as the High Speed HDMI Cable shown above, plus an additional dedicated data channel, known as the HDMI Ethernet Channel.

Further information is available in the FAQ sections 1, 2 & 3.

FAQ Section 1: HDMI™ General Questions
FAQ Section 2: HDMI™ Compatibility and Interoperability Questions
FAQ Section 3: HDMI™ Information
 

HDMI revision

1.0

1.1

1.2/1.2a

1.3/1.3a/1.3b

Maximum signal bandwidth (MHz)

165

165

165

340

Maximum TMDS bandwidth (Gbit/s)

4.95

4.95

4.95

10.2

Maximum video bandwidth (Gbit/s)

3.96

3.96

3.96

8.16

Maximum audio bandwidth (Mbit/s)

36.86

36.86

36.86

36.86

Resolutions possible over single link HDMI at 24bits/pixel

1920x1080 p60

1920x1080 p60

1920x1080 p60

2560x1600 p60

RGB

yes

yes

yes

yes

YCbCr

yes

yes

yes

yes

xvYCC

no

no

no

yes

Deep Color

no

no

no

yes

Maximum Color Depth (bits per pixel)

24

24

24

48*

Consumer Electronic Control (CEC)**

yes

yes

yes

yes

Updated list of CEC commands***

no

no

no

No (1.3a:yes)

Auto lip-sync

no

no

no

yes

8channel/192 kHz/24-bit audio capability

yes

yes

yes

yes

DVD-A support

no

yes

yes

yes

SACD (DSD) support ****

no

no

yes

yes

Dolby TrueHD bitstream capable

no

no

no

yes

DTS-HD Master Audio bitstream capable

no

no

no

yes

Blu-ray/HD DVD video and audio at full resolution*****

yes

yes

yes

yes


* = 36-bit support is mandatory for Deep Colour compatible CE devices with 48-bit support being optional.
** = CEC has been in the HDMI specification since version 1.0 but has only begun to be used in CE products with HDMI version 1.3.
*** = Large number of additions and clarifications for CEC commands. One addition is CEC command allowing for volume control of an AV receiver.
**** = Playback of SACD may be possible for older revisions if the signal source (such as the Oppo 970) converts to LPCM. For those receivers that have only PCM DAC converters and not DSD, this means that no additional resolution loss occurs.
***** = Even for audio bitstream formats that a given HDMI revision can not transport, it may still be possible to decode the bitstream in the player and transmit the audio as LPCM. For HD DVD, this is always the case, for Blu-ray, this may be the case for newer profile 1.1 players (as these will feature audio decoders anyway), while older profile 1.0 players may or may not support non-mandatory audio codecs even if HDMI 1.3 is used.
NOTE: The Sony PlayStation 3 does not currently support the delivery of Dolby TrueHD or DTS-HD Master Audio bitstreams but can decode Dolby TrueHD and deliver it at up to 7.1 channel LPCM.


FAQ Section 1: General HDMI™ Questions

Q1. What are the advantages of HDMI over existing analogue video interfaces such as composite, S-Video and component video?

Quality: Because HDMI is a digital interface, it provides the best quality of the video since there are no lossy analogies to digital conversions as are required for all analogy connections (such as component or S-video). The difference is especially noticeable at higher resolutions such as 1080p. Digital video will be sharper than component, and eliminates the softness and ghosting found with component.  Small, high contrast details such as text bring this difference out the most.

Ease-of-use: HDMI combines video and multi-channel audio into a single cable, eliminating the cost, complexity, and confusion of multiple cables currently used in A/V systems. This is particularly beneficial when equipment is being upgraded or added.

Intelligence: HDMI supports two-way communication between the video source (such as a DVD player) and the DTV, enabling new functionality such as automatic configuration and one-touch play. By using HDMI, devices automatically deliver the most effective format (e.g 480p vs 720p, 16:9 vs 4:3) for the display that it is connected to - eliminating the need for the consumer to scroll through all the format options to guess what looks best.

HD Content-Ready: HDMI devices supporting HDCP have the comfort of knowing they will have access to premium HD content now and in the future. HD-DVD and Blu-ray have delayed the activation of the image constraint token (a.k.a. content protection flag) with today’s HD movies to help minimize potential issues caused by the transition, but are expected to activate this in a few years, meaning future HD movies will then not be viewable at HD resolutions over unprotected interfaces such as analogy component.

Q2.
What is the advantage of using HDMI over existing audio interfaces such as analogy RCA connectors and digital SPDIF (coax and optical connectors)?

Quality: HDMI maintains the audio in its pure digital form all the way to the amplifier.  Analogy audio connections are more prone to losses depending on the cabling and other electronics of the audio rendering device.  Compared to SPDIF connections, HDMI has significantly more bandwidth, allowing it to support the latest lossless audio formats such as Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HS Master Audio.  These formats can not be supported over SPDIF connections due to their very high data rate requirements that exceed the capabilities of SPDIF.  Please also see section on HDMI 1.3 for further details on Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio formats.

Ease of Use: HDMI combines video and multi-channel audio into a single cable, eliminating the cost, complexity, and confusion of multiple cables currently used in A/V systems. This is particularly beneficial when equipment is being upgraded or added.

Intelligence: HDMI supports two-way communication between the audio source (such as a DVD player) and the audio rendering device (such as an A/V receiver), enabling new functionality such as automatic configuration and one-touch play. By using HDMI, devices automatically deliver the most effective format (e.g. Dolby Digital vs. 2 channels PCM) for the A/V receiver that it is connected to - eliminating the need for the consumer to scroll through all the audio format options to guess what is best and properly supported.


FAQ Section 2: HDMI™ Compatibility and Interoperability Questions

Q1. Is HDMI backward compatible with DVI (Digital Visual Interface)?
Q2. What types of video does HDMI support?
Q3. What version of HDMI does a consumer need to view 1080p content?
Q4. Do you need a new version of HDMI to play Blu-ray and HD-DVD content in high definition?
Q5. Are HDMI 1.0, 1.1 and 1.2 compatible with the next generation videogame consoles implementing 1080p and HDMI’s new Deep Colour capability?
Q6. What is HDMI’s new Deep Colour capability?
Q7. Does HDMI support Dolby 5.1 audio and high-resolution audio formats?
Q8. Does HDMI support Dolby Digital, DTS, and high-resolution audio formats?
Q9. Does HDMI support SACD?
Q10. What is the most common compatibility problem among devices with HDMI connections?
Q11. Some cable TV set-top boxes with HDMI outputs don’t deliver a picture to displays with HDMI inputs. What is the problem, and is there a solution?
Q12. If an HDMI accessory device (i.e. switch box, cable booster) does not have a dedicated power supply, is it still compliant and will it work?
Q13. Can any passive devices that use no active electronics (such as a mechanical switch box) be compliant? They are a lot cheaper.

Q1. Is HDMI backward compatible with DVI (Digital Visual Interface)?

Yes, HDMI is fully backward compatible with DVI compliant devices. HDMI DTVs will display video received from existing DVI-equipped products, and DVI-equipped TVs will display video from HDMI sources. However, some older PCs with DVI are designed only to support computer monitors, not televisions. Consumers buying a PC with DVI should make sure that it specifically includes support for television formats and not just computer monitors.

Also, consumers may want to confirm that the DVI interface supports High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP), as content that requires HDCP copy protection will require that both the HDMI and DVI devices support HDCP to properly view the video content.

Q2.
What types of video does HDMI support?

HDMI has the capacity to support existing high-definition video formats (720p, 1080i, and 1080p/60). It also has the flexibility to support enhanced definition formats such as 480p, as well as standard definition formats such as NTSC or PAL.

Q3. What version of HDMI does a consumer need to view 1080p content?

HDMI has always supported 1080p resolution, starting from version 1.0 in 2002. However, as with many functions that HDMI enables (such as DVD-Audio and SACD), it is up to the manufacturer to choose whether to implement 1080p in the device. Some TV and device manufacturers have chosen not to implement 1080p in their products because 1080p content has not been widely available, and because changing the internal electronics of the device to support 1080p would increase cost.

Viewing 1080p resolution requires at minimum that the HDTV have a display supporting the 1080p pixel resolution. Today, many HDTVs use display technologies (such as PDP, LCD, and microdisplay screens) designed for 720p pixel resolution.

In addition, some of today’s 1080p HDTVs support only 720p or 1080i on the HDMI input, then perform video processing to up-convert the 720p/1080i signal to 1080p. This is now changing, as 1080p content is becoming increasingly available, and HDTVs fully supporting 1080p in the display and HDMI electronics became more popular in the market in early 2006.

All versions of HDMI are backward compatible. Consumers should not look for a particular version of HDMI, but rather for the functionality that they want the device to support (SACD, 1080p, etc.).

Q4.
Do you need a new version of HDMI to play Blu-ray and HD-DVD content in high definition?

All versions of the HDMI specification support the ability to watch HD-DVD / Blu-ray content in high definition up to 1080p resolution. However, there may be non-HDMI reasons that prevent some devices from accessing content in high definition, including lack of HDCP support.

Q5. Are HDMI 1.0, 1.1 and 1.2 compatible with the next generation videogame consoles implementing 1080p and HDMI’s new Deep Colour capability?

HDMI has been able to support 1080p content since version 1.0, and each new revision of the HDMI specification is fully backward compatible with previous revisions.

In June 2006, the HDMI Founders announced HDMI 1.3 and new capabilities to support Deep Colour (up to 16-bit colour RGB colour) and new lossless audio formats (such as Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio). PCs and video game consoles in particular are expected to be capable of delivering content that takes advantage of HDMI's latest capabilities. When such sources are interfaced to older HDMI HDTVs, the source should automatically select the highest quality video and audio performance supported by the HDTV.  

Q6. What is HDMI’s new Deep Colour capability?

The new Deep Colour capability lets manufacturers build devices allowing consumers to enjoy billions of colours with incredible visual clarity and detail. HDMI 1.3 supports 10-bit, 12-bit and 16-bit RGB colour depths and colour space, an upgrade from the 8-bit maximum resolution in previous versions of the HDMI Specification.

Q7.
Does HDMI support Dolby 5.1 audio and high-resolution audio formats?

Yes. From the start, HDMI was defined to carry 8-channels, of 192kHz, 24-bit uncompressed audio, which exceeds all current consumer media formats. In addition, HDMI can carry any flavour of compressed audio format such as Dolby or DTS. (Such compressed formats are the only multi-channel or high-resolution audio formats that can be carried across the older S/PDIF or AES/EBU interfaces.) Additionally, most existing HDMI sources can output any compressed stream, and the newer sources can output uncompressed 6-channel, 96kHz audio from a DVD-Audio disk. There are A/V receivers on the market that can accept and process the 6- or 8-channel audio from HDMI.

Q8. Does HDMI support Dolby Digital, DTS, and high-resolution audio formats?

Yes. From the start, HDMI was defined to carry 8-channels of 192kHz, 24-bit uncompressed audio, which exceeds all current consumer media formats. In addition, HDMI can carry any currently available flavour of compressed audio format such as Dolby (including Dolby Digital EX 7.1, Dolby Digital plus 7.1, Dolby TrueHD) or DTS (including DTS-ES 6.1 and DTS-HD Master Audio). Such compressed formats are the only multi-channel or high-resolution audio formats that can be carried across the older S/PDIF or AES/EBU interfaces. HDMI 1.3 adds additional support for new lossless digital surround audio formats Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio. Additionally, most existing HDMI sources can output any compressed stream, and the newer sources can output uncompressed 6-channel, 96kHz audio from a DVD-Audio disk. There are A/V receivers on the market that can accept and process the 6- or 8-channel audio over HDMI.

Q9.
Does HDMI support SACD?

HDMI has supported One Bit Audio format, such as Super Audio CD's DSD (Direct Stream Digital), since version 1.2 (released in August, 2005). Customers interested in this feature should make sure that their device supports SACD.

Q10. What is the most common compatibility problem among devices with HDMI connections?

The most common compatibility problems have to do with HDCP. Probably the most common failure is the lack of an HDCP repeater function or failure to perform the authentication reliably in all types of usage scenarios.  We are increasingly seeing HDCP becoming less and less of a problem as manufacturers iron out the kinks in later generation devices and as cable operators download upgraded firmware to their set-top boxes.  In addition, as of November, 2006, the HDMI Founders required all HDMI devices implementing HDCP to undergo a new mandatory compliance testing program of the HDCP functions.  This is based on the HDCP Compliance Test Specification.

Q11.
Some cable TV set-top boxes with HDMI outputs don’t deliver a picture to displays with HDMI inputs. What is the problem, and is there a solution?

In some cases, the set-top box software does not activate or support the HDMI port. In other cases, cable TV set-top boxes don’t work correctly when used in conjunction with an A/V receiver (but will typically function correctly when connected directly to a TV or monitor). Investigation of some of these devices reveals that this is caused by an error in the way these set-top box devices implement HDCP. Specifically, some of those boxes do not support "HDCP repeaters" (devices that pass along the signal to another device) such as an A/V receiver or switch. We believe that this may be a problem in the initial versions of these products, and in some cases there is new firmware available that fixes this issue in HDMI (newer versions may already have this fix). We have been actively working with manufacturers to resolve these problems. We suggest that users contact their cable operator and request the new software to address these issues. As noted above, cable operators are increasingly downloading the available firmware upgrades required to fix this error.  

Q12. If an HDMI accessory device (i.e. switch box, cable booster) does not have a dedicated power supply, is it still compliant and will it work?

An HDMI device that has active electronics should have a provision for external power in order to be compliant (e.g. a receptacle to allow the use of a standard power adapter, sometimes called a power “brick”).  Here we are drawing a distinction between “active” devices that actually have some powered electronics, and “passive” devices, such as some switches (more on those later).

Some active devices, such as actively powered HDMI cables or in-line signal extender boxes, will by default attempt to power their electronics by taking power from the 5V line (+5V power) available on the HDMI connector.  The HDMI specification requires all source devices to provide at least 55mA (milliamps) on the 5V line for the purpose of reading the EDID of a display.  While 55mA is not enough current to operate most HDMI accessory devices (which typically require about 100 to 150mA), most source devices on the market today provide significantly more current on the 5V line than the HDMI specification requires.  As a result, the vast majority of accessory devices can operate when interfaced with a source device that provides more than the required current (i.e. over 100-150mA) on the 5V line.  However, manufacturers should provide a provision for their powered HDMI accessory devices to obtain external power, and consumers are encouraged to look for this external power provision when purchasing such products.   

Looking to the future, not all HDMI devices may provide this much power over the 5V line.  For example, as HDMI expands into more and more portable applications (cameras, camcorders, laptops, etc.), power consumption is often much more of an issue, and such devices may not power the 5V line with the > 100mA required by such “active” devices.  Again, consumers should consider ensuring that their active HDMI accessory device purchases have a provision for external power for this reason.

Q13. Can any passive devices that use no active electronics (such as a mechanical switch box) be compliant?

Any device which performs processing, amplification, or switching of the HDMI signal should use actively powered electronics to be compliant and perform reliably.  As mentioned in the above question, the vast majority of devices can utilize power that is supplied on the 5V line (+5V power) of the HDMI connector to function properly, although we recommend that such devices give the users an optional provision to use an external power adapter.  Completely passive, non-powered devices may work in some short-cable length applications, but use them at your own risk, as they may not operate reliably.  Even if a passive device works in one configuration, a change in equipment or cabling may introduce failures in subsequent configurations.

 

FAQ Section 3: HDMI™ v 1.3 detailed information

Q1. What’s new in the HDMI 1.3 Specification?
Q2. Do I need v1.3 HDMI to hear the new Dolby TrueHD and DTS Master HD audio content on HD-DVD or Blu-ray players?
Q3. What is the difference in quality between listening to Dolby TrueHD/DTS-HD over HDMI, SPDIF (i.e. coax or optical), or analogy from the player to the A/V receiver?
Q4. What is the difference between decoding Dolby TrueHD/DTS-HD in the player (i.e. sending over HDMI as decoded PCM) vs. decoding in the A/V receiver (i.e. sending over HDMI as encoded Dolby TrueHD/DTS-HD bitstream)?
Q5. What products or applications will take advantage of new HDMI 1.3 capabilities?
Q6. What is meant by the term “Deep Colour” and why is it important?
Q7. What is “x.v. Colour™” or “xvYCC”?
Q8. What is the difference between “Deep Colour” and “x.v.Color™” or “xvYCC”?
Q9. When will products with HDMI 1.3 capabilities be available to the public?
Q10. How will consumers know which products have the latest implementation of HDMI 1.3?
Q11. Is HDMI 1.3 backward compatible with prior releases of the HDMI spec and with DVI?
Q12. Why is Lip Sync important?


Q1. What’s new in the HDMI 1.3 Specification?

Higher speed: Although all previous versions of HDMI have had more than enough bandwidth to support all current HDTV formats, HDMI 1.3 increases its single-link bandwidth to 340 MHz (10.2 Gbps) to support the demands of future HD display devices, such as higher resolutions, Deep Colour and high frame rates. In addition, built into the HDMI 1.3 specification is the technical foundations that will let future versions of HDMI reach significantly higher speeds.
Deep Colour: HDMI 1.3 supports 10-bit, 12-bit and 16-bit (RGB or YCbCr) colour depths, up from the 8-bit depths in previous versions of the HDMI specification, for stunning rendering of over one billion colours in unprecedented detail.
Broader colour space: HDMI 1.3 adds support for “x.v.Color™” (which is the consumer name describing the IEC 61966-2-4 xvYCC colour standard), which removes current colour space limitations and enables the display of any colour viewable by the human eye.
New mini connector: With small portable devices such as HD camcorders and still cameras demanding seamless connectivity to HDTVs, HDMI 1.3 offers a new, smaller form factor connector option.
Lip Sync: Because consumer electronics devices are using increasingly complex digital signal processing to enhance the clarity and detail of the content, synchronization of video and audio in user devices has become a greater challenge and could potentially require complex end-user adjustments. HDMI 1.3 incorporates automatic audio synching capabilities that allows devices to perform this synchronization automatically with total accuracy.
New HD lossless audio formats: In addition to HDMI’s current ability to support high-bandwidth uncompressed digital audio and all currently-available compressed formats (such as Dolby® Digital and DTS®), HDMI 1.3 adds additional support for new lossless compressed digital audio formats Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio™.

Q2. Do I need v1.3 HDMI to hear the new Dolby TrueHD and DTS Master HD audio content on HD-DVD or Blu-ray players?

No. The Dolby TrueHD, Dolby Digital Plus, and DTS-HD Master Audio can be decoded by the playback device into multi-channel Pulse Code Modulation (PCM) digital audio streams, which is an audio format standard that can be sent over any version of HDMI. In fact, all versions of HDMI can support up to 8 channels of PCM audio at 192kHz, 24 bits per sample.

To do this, consumers should ensure that their playback device (such as HD-DVD or Blu-ray player) is capable of decoding these new lossless Dolby & DTS audio formats into the PCM format on the HDMI output, and that the audio device (such as an A/V receiver) is capable of receiving multi-channel PCM audio over the HDMI inputs. Consult your user manual/product specification sheet to determine whether your device supports such PCM capabilities (we believe that nearly all HD-DVD and Blu-ray players will, but users should confirm this). Devices that support HDMI v1.3 and higher may also offer the option to transport the high definition audio formats as a compressed, encoded stream over HDMI so that the decoding function can be performed by the A/V receiver (whereas the above transport method has the playback device performing the decoding).

Q3. What is the difference in quality between listening to Dolby TrueHD/DTS-HD over HDMI, SPDIF (i.e. coax or optical), or analogy from the player to the A/V receiver?

HDMI provides the highest quality as it enables the full, lossless audio data of Dolby TrueHD to be transferred digitally to the AV receiver, and enables the A/V receiver to apply its full digital audio processing capabilities (such as bass management, or sound field processing effects) to further enhance the audio quality.   SPDIF does not have the ability to support the data rates required by Dolby TrueHD, and thus will not support it.  Analogy will be lower quality than HDMI due to two reasons: 1) the nature of analogy transmission is lossy and will degrade while transported over the cables, 2) many A/V receivers will not apply any digital audio processing to the analogy inputs, and in such cases analogy signals will be sent directly to the amplifier without the benefit of such processing.

Q4. What is the difference between decoding Dolby TrueHD/DTS-HD in the player (i.e. sending over HDMI as decoded PCM) vs. decoding in the A/V receiver (i.e. sending over HDMI as encoded Dolby TrueHD/DTS-HD bitstream)?

There is no inherent difference in quality between Dolby TrueHD/DTS-HD being sent over HDMI as decoded PCM vs. encoded bit stream.  All Dolby TrueHD/DTS-HD decoders (whether in the player or the A/V receiver) must be certified to meet stringent quality requirements.  However, consumers should make sure that their receivers support the number of incoming PCM channels delivered by their source device (e.g. DVD). 

Q5. What products or applications will take advantage of new HDMI 1.3 capabilities?

According to announcements by manufacturers, new high-definition DVD formats (HD-DVD and Blu-ray) and game machines (including the Sony PLAYSTATION® 3) will make use of capabilities added in HDMI 1.3. Digital televisions will be able to present images that are closer to real life than previously has been possible. These will include LCD TVs, plasma displays and rear projection micro displays. The PS3 was the first source product to provide such high quality imagery to these displays. Please check with other manufacturers for details on their products.

Q6.
What is meant by the term “Deep Colour” and why is it important?

Deep Colour lets HDTVs and other displays go from millions of colours to billions of colours allowing consumers to enjoy unprecedented vividness and accuracy of colour on their displays. Deep Colour eliminates on-screen colour banding, for smooth tonal transitions and subtle gradations between colours. It enables increased contrast ratio, and can represent many times more shades of grey between black and white.

Q7.  What is “x.v. Colour™” or “xvYCC”?

HDMI 1.3 adopts use of the IEC 61966-2-4 colour standard, commonly called xvYCC (shorthand for Extended YCC Colorimetry for Video Applications), branded “x.v.Color™”. This new standard can support 1.8 times as many colours as existing HDTV signals. x.v.Color lets HDTVs display colours more accurately, enabling displays with more natural, vivid colours.

Q8. What is the difference between “Deep Colour” and “x.v.Color™” or “xvYCC”?

Deep Colour increases the number of available colours within the boundaries defined by the RGB or YCbCr colour space, while x.v.Color expands the available range (limits) to allow the display of colours that meet and exceed what human eyes can recognize.

Q9. When will products with HDMI 1.3 capabilities be available to the public?

They are available now. Check with individual manufacturers for details.

Q10.
How will consumers know which products have the latest implementation of HDMI 1.3?

Consumers should not look for a particular version of HDMI, but rather for the functionality that they want the device to support (Deep Colour, specific audio formats, etc.). Alternatively, consumers can look for support for these features called out in the manufacturer’s product information.

Q11. Is HDMI 1.3 backward compatible with prior releases of the HDMI spec and with DVI?


Yes, HDMI is fully backward compatible with all prior releases of the HDMI spec, as well as DVI compliant devices.

Q12. Why is Lip Sync important?

In a DTV, typically the video processing takes more time than the audio. As a result, lip sync can become an issue where it’s noticeable to the viewer, creating an effect similar to that of a badly-dubbed movie. HDMI 1.3 provides a method whereby the audio processing times in devices can be automatically adjusted to remove lip sync errors.

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